Brian Perko

Join Me at the 17th Annual SBH Oregon Claims Professional Workshop

brian perkoSBH is hosting its 17th annual Oregon Claims Professional Workshop on November 2, 2017 at the Holiday Inn in Wilsonville. Covered topics include lessons in investigations, the intersection of Oregon workers’ compensation and employment leave laws, issues related to the “course & scope” of employment, dealing with concussions and post-concussion syndrome, an update on Oregon appellate decisions, strategies for Job Descriptions and Functional Capacity Evaluations, and an informative session with DCBS advisors. For more information on attending SBH University, click here.

Join Me at the 16th Annual SBH Oregon Claims Professional Workshop

brian perkoSBH is hosting its annual Oregon Claims Professional Workshop on November 3, 2017 at the Holiday Inn in Wilsonville. Topics covered include an appellate update, independent medical exams and post traumatic stress disorder, non-subject workers, and vocational rehabilitation. You do not want to miss this years magical event! To register and for more information click here.

SBH Client Prevails on Rare Self-Injury Defense

brian perkoAttorneys Brian Perko and Rebecca Watkins recently secured a decision from the Oregon Court of Appeals upholding a denial based on the defense that the worker intentionally caused himself injury. If an injury occurs from the deliberate intention of the worker to produce such injury, it is not compensable and no benefits are payable. Employers/insurers have the burden to prove intentional self-injury, and it is a difficult defense to establish. In Wilson v. Labor Ready, SBH and its client successfully proved that the worker intentionally caused his own injury. Surveillance video, witness testimony, and a shifting story from the worker all convinced the hearing judge, Workers’ Compensation Board, and the Court of Appeals that this arm injury was caused by… Continue reading

Some Common Sense from The Oregon Court of Appeals!

brian perko Employers have reason to celebrate following the April 17, 2013 decision from the Court of Appeals in Pamela Hamilton v. SAIF. In this course and scope case, the Court ruled that an injury sustained when a worker fainted and fell in the course of her employment was not compensable. Claimant worked as a cook/cashier and was standing in the employer’s kitchen when she fainted and fell, striking her face on a brick floor and sustaining facial and dental damage. SAIF denied the claim. At hearing, claimant conceded the fainting incident and resultant fall… Continue reading